Something to share from All In A Jar

I had a class yesterday with some locals . I’m part of Nextdoor Lake Camanche North Shore. It is a wonderful site that the neighbors can share events, ask questions and let each other  know what is going on in our community. I offered a class at a reduced price to introduce All In A Jar to the neighbors. I’m so grateful that some students signed up. We had a great time together. This is what I found on the site today. I wanted to share it with you.

Penny’s All in a Jar Class

I have to let my neighbors know about my experience at Penny Porter’s Canning class yesterday! Right when you arrive at her home, the stage is immediately set; The Farm is exquisite! I got to meet All in a Jar owner Penny, sweet Wendy, and the chubby pupper Ruby. We visited the thriving, full garden and pulled the beets straight out and into the house! The class was informative and simply a blast! The lunch was pesto pasta and salad, and even the pesto was intriguing as she used kale and walnuts, sooo good! The pickled beets in the salad assured me that although I may have come into the class as a “beet sceptic”, in a few weeks I will be digging into a jar of deliciousness. 

I learned so much from just this one class. I’ve been looking for an easy way to introduce myself to the kitchen besides the slow cooker and i think I found my new favorite dinner/gift maker!

Thank you so much Penny for putting on this much needed class and being so hospitable. I’m already gushing to my family and friends about the experience and planning our class.

Up Coming Classes

100_2441

I love my new place but, I get the internet when the wind is blowing just right, so sometimes yes others no.
Also, having some issues with my calendar trying to upload my up and coming classes. Not sure if it is an internet thing or I just can’t remember how to get to it. So, anyway here are a few classes coming up.

Please let me know if there are any recipes you would like to learn.

Classes will be held at All In A Jar’s new location 3944 Curran Road, Ione, Ca. 95640 the last Saturday of each month.They will start at 11:00am and go for 3 to 4 hours. Depending on the recipes for that day. We will be making and sharing a meal together. No class in December.

October 31 at 11:00am

* Eggplant Caponata
This is like a thick and chunky Italian salsa. Great on sandwiches, steak or on some rusty bread with cheese.

* Rhubarb Raisin Chutney
This is a sweet-spicy condiment with intense flavor chile peppers,, tangy rhubarb, and a combination of the North African spices cumin seeds, coriander seeds and caraway seeds. It is wonderful with cheese crackers and grilled pork chops and chicken.

November 28 at 11:00 am

* Cinnamon Caramel Apple Syrup
This is wonderful on French toast, waffles, pancakes and ice cream.

* Roasted Pickled Beets With Orange slices
I love roasted beets and I love pickled beets. Beets and orange are wonderful in salads. So I have put them together for the perfect mix.

December Closed

January 30 at 11:00 am

* Vidalia Onion Conserve
This jar is a great appetizer just waiting to wow you. Make small puff pastry squares brush with beaten egg and bake according to package directions. Top with some onion conserve, goat cheese and thyme.

* Black Pepper Rosemary Sliced Apple
This is wonderful on top of pork. You could use it with a cheese platter too.

February 27 at 11:00am

* Penny’s Cheesecake

This cheesecake is like have a cheese platter for dessert. There is no cream cheese in this cake.

* Ginger Pears
This jar is indeed dessert. We will be putting it on top of our cheesecake.
You can also make it into a pie or put it on top of ice cream or in yogurt.

I’m looking forward to having you here on The Farm. Please email me letting me know what classes you would like to attend.
You can also make it into a pie or put it on top of ice cream or in yogurt.

POSTED IN CLASS | TAGGED AFRICAN SPICES, CAPONATA, CHUTNEY, CLASSES, CONSERVE, DESSERT, MEAL, NEW LOCATION, PICKLED, RECIPES, SYRUP | EDIT

Chili, Chile, or Peppers

100_1572Proud to have a guest blogger.

Chili, Chile, or Peppers?
By Mike Strauss, Pit Master, Bay Area BBQ.Info

Chili, Chile, or peppers; what’s the difference? Simply stated, they are all chili peppers.
Chili peppers are usually broken down into 3 varieties: Bell peppers, Sweet Peppers, and Hot Peppers.

All three varieties have been part of the human diet since 6000BC.
Their pungent flavors made them a valuable trading commodity and were used for barter throughout the world as part of the spice trade routes.
For me, they satisfy three of my passions; cooking, gardening and photography. They are such beautiful plants, easy to grow, and the chili pods, (with are actually berries), come in a rainbow of beautiful colors, shapes and sizes.
I love to go out into my pepper garden, (which I named Peppertopia) and walk through the many varieties to see the changing of colors as they ripen. It gives me a thrill to watch them grow and harvest their bounty.
When I have picked a variety of peppers, I like to take close up pictures and showcase their contrasting colors and shapes.
Some plants are so beautiful; I think I would plant them as accent plants and ornaments. Some of these are the Peruvian Purple, Black Pearl, Zimbabwe Bird’s Eye, and Orange Thai Dragons.
As we all know, peppers come in varying degrees of heat. The active ingredient in peppers is called Capsaicin. When eaten or applied to the skin, the capsaicinoids trigger the pain receptors in our nervous system and tell the brain we have just eaten something hot! The brain reacts by increasing our heart beat, internal temperature (which causes perspiration), and releasing endorphins to ease the pain.
Scientists measure the concentration of capsaicin using the Scoville Heat Units or SHU.
Standard Grocery Store Peppers
Sweet Bell Peppers have 0-4 SHU
Mild Green Chili or Anaheim chilies have 2-5 SHU
Jalapeno peppers have 2,500-5,000 SHU
Habanero peppers have 250,000-300,000
Extremely Hot Peppers
Infinity Peppers have 1.2 Million SHU
Bhut Jolokia (Ghost) Peppers have 1.5 Million SHU
Trinidad Moruga Scorpion Peppers have 2 Million SHU
Carolina Reaper Peppers have 2.2 Million SHU
Chili Peppers are used fresh in sauces, salsas, and mixed into foods, or stuffed. The pods are often preserved dried, smoked, or pickled. They can be reconstituted for later use, or powdered. I use all of the methods, as each one allows me to use them in countless recipes.
My first experiment with extremely hot peppers started when my customers said my hot barbecue sauce wasn’t hot enough.  I was adding plenty of crushed red pepper flakes, but I wasn’t getting that mouth tingling sensation that today’s hot sauce freaks are looking for.     I started purchasing jalapenos and adding them to my recipes, but I still wasn’t getting the results they wanted. It wasn’t until I added Habanero peppers to the mix, that I finally found a source of heat. But, I wasn’t done yet. Although Habanero Peppers have a great flavor, the amount of pepper flesh needed to make it hot enough, gave the sauce a very green vegetable taste. I tried cooking the sauce longer, thinking that it was the raw pepper flesh that was giving it the vegetable taste, but that didn’t work. It wasn’t until I dried and powdered the peppers that I could reach the heat levels, maintain the Habanero flavor, and keep their mouths’ burning.
Since then, I have been growing my own peppers to add that special flavor to numerous recipes.

Today I have 80 plants of 15 different varieties. I no longer grow Jalapeno, Cayenne, or Pablano peppers, because they are available in stores nearly all year. I tend to grow the exotics, extremely hot or colorful pepper varieties. Most all are available online or special order from local nurseries.
Now I am honing my skills of matching flavor profiles of foods to the species of peppers. Last year’s creations were Water Melon Habanero Sauce and pineapple ghost pepper rib glaze. This year I has given a huge box of peaches and came up with a sauce that I call, “Sweet Heat” and “Extra Hot Sweet Heat”. I combined the sweetness of the peaches with the heat and flavor of Habanero peppers to form Sweet Heat. But again, the public loved the flavor, but wanted that extra kick, so I added fresh Zimbabwe Bird’s Eye Peppers to take it to the next level.
I have added my pepper powder to my spice rubs, and came up with “Kicken’ Chicken” and “Angry Bee Butt Rub”. The Angry Bee is a combination of my standard rub with Scorpion peppers and powdered honey.  I think it would also pair well with my homemade bacon.

I hope you enjoyed the first guest blogger. Please let me know if you have a topic that you would like to know more about.

See you in class