Happy Valentine’s Day

All In A Jar hope you and your loved one has a wonderful day.

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Happy New Year

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Why do you eat Black Eye Peas.
If you are anything like me, you have been eating black eye peas on New Year Day for good luck for the coming new year. So, this year I decided to find out just why we think black eye peas bring us good luck. Here is what I found.  After reading this, I  put my pot of black eye peas on the stove for an amazing year of good luck. Best to you and your families.

Do you know why black-eyed peas are lucky on New Year’s Day? As with most superstitions, there are several answers to the question. Typically, the belief that black-eyed peas are a lucky New Year’s meal is especially popular in the south, so it has to do with our history, right? Maybe.
Most Southerners will tell you that it dates back to the Civil War. Black-eyed peas were considered animal food (like purple hull peas). The peas were not worthy of General Sherman’s Union troops. When Union soldiers raided the Confederates food supplies, legend says they took everything except the peas and salted pork. The Confederates considered themselves lucky to be left with those meager supplies, and survived the winter. Peas became symbolic of luck.

Black-eyed peas were also given to slaves, as were most other traditional New Year’s foods. Let’s face it: a lot of the stuff we eat on New Year’s is soul food. One explanation of the superstition says that black-eyed peas were all the southern slaves had to celebrate with on the first day of January, 1863. What were they celebrating? That was the day when the Emancipation Proclamation went into effect. From then on, peas were always eaten on the first day of January.
Others say that since the south has generally always been the place for farming, black-eyed peas are just a good thing to celebrate with in the winter. Not many crops grow this time of the year, but black-eyed peas hold up well, were cheap and just made sense.
The oldest explanation for this tradition I found is on Wikipedia. According to Wikipedia, the tradition dates as far ancient Egypt. During the time of the Pharaohs, it was believed that eating a meager food like black-eyed peas showed humility before the gods, and you would be blessed. According to Wikipedia, the Babylonian Talmud, which dates to 339 CE, instructs the faithful Jews to eat black-eyed peas at Rosh Hashana. The belief was similar: those who ate black-eyes showed their humility and saved themselves from the wrath of Gods.
Some people believe you should cook them with a new dime or penny, or add it to the pot before serving. The person who receives the coin in their portion will be extra lucky. Some say you should eat exactly 365 peas on New Year’s day. If you eat any less, you’ll only be lucky for that many days. I guess on leap years, you need to eat an extra one. If you eat any more than 365 peas, it turns those extra days into bad luck. Some say you should leave one pea on your plate, to share your luck with someone else (more of the humbleness that peas seems to represent). Some say if you don’t eat every pea on your plate, your luck will be bad.

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So Much To Share!

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Hi everyone, I can’t believe summer is over and kids are back to school.
I had a wonderful summer with a few trips and a lot of experimenting in the kitchen. If you know me, you know I’m addicted to preserving food. Not only have I been making new recipes for canning, but I have also been learning more about fermenting. Which leads me to a small problem. I have too many jars! Some would say this isn’t a problem, but I know I can’t eat it all. So I would like to share with you some of the overflow. All you need to do is sign up for a class and let me know which jar you would like to receive. (See the list below) Your jar will be ready to go home with you at the end of the class you have chosen. I have added 15 jars after this photo. Check out the class calendar for new up coming recipes. Happy Canning.

List of jar to share:

Pineapple Rum Vanilla Bean Jam
Cranberry Winter Delight
Blood orange Marmalade
Cranberry Wine Jelly
Apple Cranberry Jam
Pear Ginger Jam
Mango Kaffir Lime Jam
Sparkling Wine Orange Jelly
Carrot Pineapple Orange Marmalade
Blueberry Apple Jam with Fennel Bay
Meyer Lemon Jelly
Strawberry Rhubarb Pie Filling
Chinese Plum Sauce
Blueberry Berry Ginger Jam
Cranberry Blueberry Chipotle Ketchup
Cranberry Blueberry Ketchup
Pickled Beets with Raspberry
Coco Hot sauce
Grainy Beer Mustard
Cranberry Ketchup
Blueberry Dipping Sauce
Cranberry Orange Vinegar
Hard Cider Asian Pear Pickled
Cranberry Quince Chutney
Pickled Jalapeño Cactus
Pear Port Thyme
Caramelized Red Onion Relish
Can Corn
Corn Relish
Plum Dipping Sauce
Almond Pears
Papaya Mango Pineapple
Mango Vanilla Bean Rum Jam
Chicken Stock
Salsa Verde

I’m sure you can find a jar that you and your family would enjoy.

See you in class