On The Road Again

 

 

 

All In A Jar is traveling to “The Kitchen ” Please contact them for Sept. 24th class
Dianne McArthur “The Kitchen” at Alamo Hardware 3211 Danville Blvd
Alamo CA 94507 phone 925.837.2420 ext.313
Sept. 24th 11:00 at ” The Kitchen”

Toasted Walnut Plum Conserve , This sweet and toasted mixture is off the hook with baked brie cheese. Your guests will be asking, where did you get this?
Cucumber Mint Jelly , use as a glaze on grilled lamb chops or grilled salmon or serve with crackers and cream cheese. 
Pear Rosemary Preserve , This preserve is wonderful beside some pork.

Can Your Own Produce

I have to say I’m living my dream. My garden is overflowing with produce. I have been canning up a storm. Yesterday I canned Fig Jam, Pepper Jelly, Eggplant Preserves, Roasted Tomato Sauce and dehydrated Crook Neck Squash. I hope you are having a bumper crop year too. Did you know All In A Jar can help you with your produce. No sense of wasting it. We can preserve it to have for future use. 

 

If you have a large quantity of your own fruits or vegetables that you would like to use for  canning, please contact All In A Jar to set up a private session. The class will cost $35.00 per person, and you will leave with all of the jars that you produce. This class requires two or more people. All In A Jar will provide all of the necessary tools and knowledge for the class.

For private classes you will:

-bring your own ingredients
-bring your own jars

You will learn two different recipes specific to your ingredients.
You will spend three hours with Instructor Penny Porter learning about canning.

I will be there to guide you through every step and provide you with an appropriate recipe that will make your fruits and vegetables shine! If other ingredients are required I will discuss this with you upon scheduling your class.

Note:  All ingredients and tools are supplied by All In A Jar for regularly scheduled classes.

It’s Pickling Time

 

 

It’s pickling time of year! I just want to remind you of a few things to get the best pickle. 

One, is the type of cucumber you are using to make pickles. You need a pickling cucumber. The best ones are from the black spine type, with small black prickles, such as the Chicago Pickling Cucumber and National Pickle.

Wash all ingredients carefully to remove bacteria, which might spoil your product. In washing cucumbers, DON’T scrub so that you remove the black prickles. A good way to get off the dirt and bacteria is to soak them for a few minutes in a glass or plastic container with a tablespoon of pickling salt and one tablespoon of vinegar. Rinse well in running water as you gently rub them.                                The pot you will be using to make the brine should never be brass, copper, iron or aluminum. Any of these will produce a strange taste and undesirable color changes because the metals will react with the vinegar and salt solutions. Use enameled ware, glass, or stainless steel. Stir with wood spoon and or stainless steel ladle.  

Whenever possible, use water without chlorine. Here is how you can use your water to eliminate chlorine and other minerals. Plan in advance and boil the water for 15 minutes. Let stand for 24 hours. When all the sediment has settled to the bottom, ladle the water from the top. Add 1 tablespoon of white vinegar with 5 % acidity to each gallon of water before using. Or buy bottled distilled water and add 1 tablespoon of vinegar to each gallon. You will never regret all this effort. 

Do not use table salt in pickling or canning. Table salt has iodine and anti-caking agent. That will turn pickles an undesirable color and soften the pickle. Use Pickling salt for best results. 

Vinegar should be 5 % acidity. Check the label for percentage of acid and also check the expiration date. If it is past the expiration date, use it to make salad dressing not pickles. Vinegars of unknown strength should not be used. Either cider or white vinegars may be used. When pickling light-colored foods such as onions, white vinegars is preferable for it will not darken the ingredients. When making a simple solution of vinegar, pickling salt, and water, do not boil more than 5 to 6 minutes unless otherwise directed in the recipes. Long boiling weakens vinegar. Follow the timings suggested in the recipes: if a recipe says bring just to boil, do that. 

Always use fresh spices and herbs. Old ones will discolor the product and produce musty, strange flavors. If a recipe calls for you to put spices in a spice bag ( cheesecloth tied with kitchen twine) make sure it is not too tight so the brine can flow through during the cooking time. Remove bag before canning. If you have access to fresh grape leaves, wash them and place on top of produce in the jar. This will keep the produce under the brine and help with keeping the produce crisp. Any recipe can be changed to fit individual taste in SPICES Only. Do not change the amount of vinegar, water or salt. Blended pickling spices are available commercially, I like to blend my own. Here are a list of spices I like using: Allspice, Bay Leaf, Black Pepper Corns, Cardamom, Cayenne, Chili, Cinnamon Stick, Coriander Seeds, Clove, Dill Seeds, Ginger, Mustard Seeds, Nutmeg ( grated), Hot Red Pepper flakes, Turmeric, and Celery Seeds. 

Garlic is a wonderful addition to pickles. But one warning; If you wish to add garlic to a jar of dill pickles or any pickles, you will need to peel the cloves then plunge them into boiling water first for 1 minute. This blanching process kills the bacteria on garlic, which can cause spoilage. Or you can place the cloves in vinegar for about 1 to 2 minutes before filling the jars. 

I hope this helps you get the best pickle for you and your family. 

See you in class