Finally It Fells Like Fall

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What a wonderful summer All In A Jar had with the students that attended classes. Thank you! We had access to a lot of beautiful fruits and vegetables to play with in class. Some people think it is time to put away the canning supplies. But wait… no need to; we have more canning to do. What about all those amazing pears? You can make pears with toasted almonds and almond liqueur, pear ginger jam, hearty chutney or pear halves in simple syrup. So many varieties of apples out there too, what about a spicy apple butter, apple pie filling,  applesauce or apple jelly. For those oranges, how about marmalade or sparkling wine orange jelly or orange vanilla crud. Some other great ideas, persimmon jam or butter, pickled brussels sprouts, cauliflower, onions, carrots and beets. Fall and winter are great times to can, added bonus of warming your home up too. Especially when using your pressure canner because it has a long processing cook-time. With the pressure canner you can be making soups, stews, beans, tuna, and much more. This is a great time to make some homemade sausage for the freezer; cooler days work best when working with meat. Don’t let the cold weather or rain stop you from canning! Homemade canned goods make the best gifts. So get in the kitchen and start canning! The holidays are  coming.
November 29 Saturday is support local small businesses. Please remember our local small businesses when shopping for gifts this holiday season.

All In A Jar offers Gift Certificates.

All In A Jar will be adding to the class calendar in the next few days. Check out what will be offered in January and February. Happy Canning!

All In A Jar offers Gift Certificates.

See you in class

Half Full

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I received another great question from a student. Their question was, “When I’m canning and I only have enough food left to fill half of a jar, do I process that jar that is only filled up half way?” The answer is no. Every recipe has a head space recommendation which needs to be carefully followed. As a general rule, leave 1 inch of head space for low-acid foods like vegetables and meats (when you are pressure canning); leave 1/2 inch head space for high-acid foods like fruits, tomatoes, pickles, and relishes; 1/4 inch head space for jams and jellies. Care must be taken when filling jars to the correct head space. To much air can turn food a dark color and may cause it to begin to mold. To much food in a jar can cause the jar to break in the water bath during processing. If you have a jar that is only half full, put it in the refrigerator and eat it first.

See you in class