New Chapter


Hello All In A Jar fans,

This is a happy and yet sad blog, I need to share with you that All In A Jar will be moving in March of this year. It is a happy time because my husband and I, will be starting a new chapter in our life’s moving up to the Gold Country. We are looking forward to having a garden, fruit trees and some chickens.  I will continue to teach once we get settled in.

But yet sad, because I  leave behind all the wonderful students that have come to my classes. I will try my best to keep blogging during this very busy part of my life. The class calendar goes to the end of February. Please come join me in the last of the classes here in Lafayette. You can always  email me with questions. I will do my best to help and of course you can always come up to the Gold Country for a class.

I am considering having All In A Jar  travel to students homes.
Please let me know if that would be something you would like.
Best wishes to all of you and Happy Canning.

See you in class

Happy New Year

Why do you eat Black Eye Peas.
If you are anything like me, you have been eating black eye peas on New Year Day for good luck for the coming new year. So, this year I decided to find out just why we think black eye peas bring us good luck. Here is what I found.  After reading this, I  put my pot of black eye peas on the stove for an amazing year of good luck. Best to you and your families.

Do you know why black-eyed peas are lucky on New Year’s Day? As with most superstitions, there are several answers to the question. Typically, the belief that black-eyed peas are a lucky New Year’s meal is especially popular in the south, so it has to do with our history, right? Maybe.
Most Southerners will tell you that it dates back to the Civil War. Black-eyed peas were considered animal food (like purple hull peas). The peas were not worthy of General Sherman’s Union troops. When Union soldiers raided the Confederates food supplies, legend says they took everything except the peas and salted pork. The Confederates considered themselves lucky to be left with those meager supplies, and survived the winter. Peas became symbolic of luck.

Black-eyed peas were also given to slaves, as were most other traditional New Year’s foods. Let’s face it: a lot of the stuff we eat on New Year’s is soul food. One explanation of the superstition says that black-eyed peas were all the southern slaves had to celebrate with on the first day of January, 1863. What were they celebrating? That was the day when the Emancipation Proclamation went into effect. From then on, peas were always eaten on the first day of January.
Others say that since the south has generally always been the place for farming, black-eyed peas are just a good thing to celebrate with in the winter. Not many crops grow this time of the year, but black-eyed peas hold up well, were cheap and just made sense.
The oldest explanation for this tradition I found is on Wikipedia. According to Wikipedia, the tradition dates as far ancient Egypt. During the time of the Pharaohs, it was believed that eating a meager food like black-eyed peas showed humility before the gods, and you would be blessed. According to Wikipedia, the Babylonian Talmud, which dates to 339 CE, instructs the faithful Jews to eat black-eyed peas at Rosh Hashana. The belief was similar: those who ate black-eyes showed their humility and saved themselves from the wrath of Gods.
Some people believe you should cook them with a new dime or penny, or add it to the pot before serving. The person who receives the coin in their portion will be extra lucky. Some say you should eat exactly 365 peas on New Year’s day. If you eat any less, you’ll only be lucky for that many days. I guess on leap years, you need to eat an extra one. If you eat any more than 365 peas, it turns those extra days into bad luck. Some say you should leave one pea on your plate, to share your luck with someone else (more of the humbleness that peas seems to represent). Some say if you don’t eat every pea on your plate, your luck will be bad.

See you in class

Jingle Jar, Jingle Jar, Jingle Jar Rock

Wow, where has the time gone? I can’t believe it is Christmas in just a few days.I guess the old saying is true, ” Time Flies When You Are Having Fun!” I have had a great time this year with all of my wonderful students. We have done everything from canning, making sausages, barbecue classes, fermenting, pressure canning, to baking. With all the interest in how I make my short bread, pie crust and cream puffs, I thought I’d adventure towards the oven. It has been a very yummy year! I have asked students what they would like me to teach next year and have gotten a few answers like, mustard recipes, fermenting, vegetable stock, and more delicious baked goods.

I know this is a super busy time of year, but I just wanted to Thank You for all your support this past year. Some of you have brought friends and family to classes to help my business grow and I appreciate all the support.

See you in class